The Staffroom🎙 #9: ‘The Science of Sketch-noting’ Oliver Caviglioli

‘The Staffroom’ is back! In the first episode of Series 2, we were lucky enough to speak to Oliver Caviglioli about the power of learning visuals and its basis in cognitive psychology. Oliver (@olicav) is an information designer who is widely known as an expert in visualising educational concepts. In recent years, he has worked with lots of different teacher-authors in illustrating their books.

Our chat with Oliver gave us some real insight into the use of visuals (such as sketch-noting) to conceptualise, categorise and organise information to enhance learning.

Here’s a break-down of our chat complete with time-stamps:

  • How did Oliver’s background and interest in ‘behaviourism’ influence his work as an information designer? (4:04)
  • Why does Oliver believe his visuals are becoming more and more popular with educators around the world? (6:07)
  • Why does Oliver think sketch-noting should not be ‘artistic’ and individualised? Why does he believe it is important to keep it simple? (8:30)
  • Why does Oliver think that all teachers should know about cognitive psychology? (10:09)
  • Why does Oliver believe it is important for teachers to use a balance of cognitive psychological research and educational research? (12:15)
  • What is ‘precis’ and why is it an important way of learning? Why does Oliver think that summarising/sketch-noting is an effective method of learning? (12:49)
  • Who is Ruth Colvin Clark and what does she say about decorative visuals and explanatory visuals? (14:29)
  • What is the main tip Oliver gives to people who want advice about their sketch-notes? (16:08)
  • How does Oliver think teachers should practice sketch-noting effectively with students? (16:50)
  • Is Oliver an advocate of technology to support and accelerate learning? (20:20)
  • If Oliver could recommend one professional learning book to a new teacher, what would it be and why? (20:35)
  • Where can people find Oliver’s work online? Where are his books available to buy? (24:01)

If you’d like further information about Oliver, you can check-out his work with Dr Megan Sumeracki (@DrSumeracki) and Dr Yana Weinstein who are the creators of The Learning Scientists project. Their book is called ‘Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide’ – check this out now! Also, if you’re interested in our colleagues’ Apple book on ‘The Science of Sketch’-noting, take a look at Jamie Clark and Daniel Budd’s digital book here.

We hope you enjoy this episode of The Staffroom and found Oliver’s words as fascinating as we did. We can’t wait to make sketch-noting and informational design part of our practice!

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2

 

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The Staffroom🎙 Special Thanks!

We’d like to say a big thank you to the guests who have kindly given up their time to chat to us in our debut series of ‘The Staffroom’. We’ve covered a range of topics from technology integration to enhancing student engagement right through to managing our own well-being. Here’s a run-down of who we were privileged to speak to:

 

We’d also like to thank the following people who made the podcast possible:

  • Jamie Clark – Creator and Producer
  • Tessa Johnson – Host
  • Michael Royall – Host
  • Yun Chen – Sound Technician
  • Evan Georgopoulos – Sound Technician
  • Daniel Budd – Director of Learning Technologies

 

Lastly, a huge thank you to our listeners. We hope you have found as much value in the podcast as we have ourselves. We will return with the next series of ‘The Staffroom’ in the near future so keep a keen ear and eye out for series 2!

 

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

 

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2

The Staffroom🎙 #8: ‘Slow Teaching, High Impact’ Jamie Thom & James Ramsey

In this episode of ‘The Staffroom’, we chatted with English Teacher and author Jamie Thom (@teachgratitude1) about the way slowing-down and taking stock can lead to better teacher well-being and student outcomes. We also talked to Humanities teacher, James Ramsey about the way low-stakes, high-impact formative assessment strategies are making a difference in his learning area.

In our first interview, Jamie Thom speaks about his book, ‘Slow Teaching: Finding Calm, Clarity and Impact in the Classroom’ and refocusing practice so that teachers only do things for the right reasons. Here’s a break-down of Jamie’s ideas:

  • What inspired Jamie to write ‘Slow Teaching’? How have his professional experiences shaped his reflective ideas on slow teaching and finding calm and clarity in the classroom? (3:40)
  • What does Jamie say ‘Slow Teaching’ is about? (3:40)
  • What is Jamie’s ‘tortoise and the hare’ analogy? How does Jamie believe this fable reflects the teaching profession? (7:55)
  • What made Jamie realise that a slower approach was the key to well-being and making an impact in the classroom? (11:13)
  • Why does Jamie believe nuanced skills such as classroom management, non-verbal communicationetc are essential in developing a slow and measured teaching style? (13:40)
  • Which strategiesfrom Jamie’s book have had a profound impact in his classroom? (18:31)
  • How does Jamie ensure modellingis used effectively with his students? (23:35)
  • What are Jamie’s views on well-being? What are Jamie’s top three well-being tips for a new graduate teacher? (26:17)

 

Head of Learning Area at Corpus Christi College, James Ramsey, spoke to us about the practical ways formative assessment and feedback is having an impact in his classes. Here is a break-down of James’ responses:

  • How have formative assessmentstrategies changed James’ practice in recent years? (32:50)
  • In what ways does James believe the shift away from frequent summative assessment has changed student mindset? (35:10)
  • What does James think are the main principleswhich under-pin his teaching and learning philosophy? (36:30)
  • Which tech-toolsdoes James believe have helped enhance his use of formative assessment? How do these tools work? (39:50)
  • What practical approaches has James implemented which help save time and/or reduce teacher workload? (42:50)

 

We hope you enjoy this episode of The Staffroom and found Jamie and James’ ideas as thought provoking as we did. The mantra of slowing down, stripping-back and streamlining teaching has certainly struck a chord with us! We wish Jamie Thom and James Ramsey all the best for 2018.

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2

The Staffroom🎙 #7: ‘The Cognitive Psychology of Learning’ Dr Yana Weinstein

In this episode of ‘The Staffroom’, we chatted with Dr Yana Weinstein (@doctorwhy), an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Psychology at University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Yana spoke with us about the way research-based cognitive science can be applied to education in order to enhance learning.

Together with Dr Megan Sumeracki (@DrSumeracki), Yana is the creator of The Learning Scientists project. Their website is becoming well-known by students and teachers around the world as it hosts a popular blog and offers a variety of practical resources and materials on cognitive science strategies. They also have an excellent podcast show, The Learning Scientists Podcast. Check it out!

In their work, Yana and Megan have identified what they call, Six Strategies for Effective Learning based on decades of research in cognitive psychology. In no particular order, here they are:

  1. Spaced Practice
  2. Retrieval Practice
  3. Elaborative Interrogation
  4. Interleaving
  5. Concrete Examples
  6. Dual Coding

In this episode, we were fortunate to speak with Yana about, spaced practice, retrieval practice, interleaving and dual coding. Here’s a break-down of Yana’s responses:

  • What are Yana’s Six Strategies for Effective Learning and how were they identified? (6:07)
  • Which of the six strategies does Yana place more value on? Why are they the most effective? (10:21)
  • How does Yana define retrieval practice and why is it a powerful strategy for learning? (11:40)
  • How can educators implement retrieval practice into their teaching? What techniques does Yana suggest are most effective? (12:55)
  • How does Yana suggest spaced practice can be combined with retrieval practice? (15:40)
  • What is dual coding and how does Yana believe teachers can make the most of it with students? (16:40)
  • Interleaving means switching between ideas and ‘jumbling-up’ learning. Why does Yana consider it a powerful technique, and how can teachers use it? (18:45)
  • What does Yana think is the most powerful way students can use some of the six strategies together? (21:39)

We hope you enjoy this episode of The Staffroom and found Yana’s six strategies as fascinating as we did. We can’t wait to build these strategies into our practice and teach students how to study properly!

We wish Dr Yana Weinstein all the best for 2018 and her continuing success of The Learning Scientists project.

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2

The Staffroom🎙 #6: Leading Change with Abdul Chohan & Karen Prendergast

In episode 6 of The Staffroom, we were fortunate to speak with award-winning technology consultant and inspirational change-management expert Abdul Chohan. We also spoke with our very own change-management champion, Vice Principal of Corpus Christi College, Karen Prendergast.

Abdul Chohan is a well-known leader and recognised for his integration of digital learning strategies in a number of UK schools. In the episode, Abdul speaks with us about his pioneering work in developing change through his philosophy of simplicity and reliability at Essa Academy and The Olive Tree School.

Here’s a break-down of our chat with Abdul complete with time-stamps:

  • How did Abdul’s change-management journey begin? How did he introduce technology to his school and what was the reaction? (3:40)
  • What does Abdul believe is necessary to lead successful change in a school? (5:09)
  • What is Abdul’s ‘island’ analogy and why is it effective in changing a school culture? (5:09)
  • Why does Abdul believe relationships are key when it comes to initiating change? (8:30)
  • How has Abdul changed the culture of marking and feedback at The Olive Tree School? How has the integration of technology included parents in this process? (10:15)
  • Which simple and reliable apps does Abdul’s school use to promote effective feedback? (12:21)
  • What non-negotiable policies has Abdul introduced at his school? How does this help maintain a ‘critical mass’? (13:41)
  • What is Abdul’s vision on printing and textbooks? How have digital technologies saved teachers time and saved the school money? (14:35)
  • How does Abdul think that the introduction of technology has helped to decrease teacher workload? (19:00)
  • What strategies does Abdul think are important in order to assist leaders with change? (20:00)
  • How has Abdul changed the professional learning culture at his school? (22:25)
  • How does Abdul measure the impact of change in his school? (24:30)

Karen Prendergast is known for leading change at Corpus Christi College by developing a school-wide teaching and learning philosophy with the University of Southern Queensland. Karen speaks with us about the valuable factors which underpin a change in school culture.

Here’s what we asked her:

  • What is a school wide pedagogy and why does Karen believe it is a necessary change for her school? (30:00)
  • How does Karen ensure the whole college community has a say in the organisation’s change in culture? (31:25)
  • What does Karen believe are the main challenges when implementing a change of culture in the college? (34:20)
  • What advice would Karen give to leaders before they go about changing the teaching and learning culture in a school? (37:06)
  • In change management, why does Karen believe it is important that staff set goals which align with the school’s strategic plan? (38:20)
  • How does Karen believe goal setting is supported by growth coaching? (40:50)

We hope you enjoy this episode of The Staffroom and find Abdul and Karen’s leadership vision as inspirational as we did.

We wish Abdul and Karen all the best for 2018 and the development of their organisations.

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

 

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2

 

The Staffroom🎙 #5: ‘The Learning Rainforest’ Tom Sherrington

In this week’s episode of The Staffroom, we were privileged to speak with former head-teacher, consultant, prolific blogger and author, Tom Sherrington.

With a large online following, Tom is well-known across the world for his wise, balanced and practical ideas which he shares regularly on Twitter and on his well-known blog, teacherhead.com. In the episode, Tom speaks with us about his hugely popular book, The Learning Rainforest – an accessible text which takes look at the big-picture of great schools and the invaluable detail of what makes great teaching.

We genuinely enjoyed chatting with Tom. His experience, insight and intellect shone throughout our interview.

So, without further ado, here’s a break-down of our chat complete with time-stamps:

  • How has Twitter and social media developed Tom as a leader? How has Tom’s blog grown over the years? (4:05)
  • What does Tom’s metaphor, ‘The Learning Rainforest’ mean? Who is Tom’s book aimed at? (6:50)
  • How does Tom break down his metaphor? What are the main three elements of the ‘rainforest tree’ and how are these explored in the book? (8:58)
  • What does Tom see as the characteristics of a ‘plantation’ school environment and a ‘rainforest’ environment? (9:28)
  • What does Tom believe are the main challenges for leaders aspiring to establish a rainforest thinking culture and ethos? (12:15)
  • How does Tom feel about the debate between progressive (student-centred) and traditional (teacher-centred) approaches to teaching and learning? What are his views? (16:35)
  • How does Tom believe we can strike a balance between traditional and progressive teaching? (19:50)
  • What does Tom call, ‘Mode A’ and ‘Mode B’ teaching? (22:24)
  • Why does Tom think it is important that we shift away from summative data tracking and move towards authentic formative assessment? (26:00)
  • What is responsive teaching and what does Tom think this looks like in an effective ‘rainforest’ classroom? (29:15)
  • What are the top three practical approaches Tom would recommend a new teacher to implement into their practice? (32:34)

We hope you enjoy this episode of The Staffroom and find Tom’s educational philosophy as inspirational as we did. You can grab a copy of The Learning Rainforest which is available on Amazon now. We highly recommend you introduce this book to your school leaders, and plant the seeds for your own learning rainforest! Be sure to subscribe to Tom’s blog and follow him on Twitter @teacherhead.

We wish Tom all the best for 2018 and the growing success of his blog and consultancy business.

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

 

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2

 

The Staffroom🎙 #4: ‘Engagement, Mindset & Well-being’ Dan Haesler

This week on The Staffroom we were lucky to chat with education expert, Dan Haesler from Sydney, Australia.

With over 14,000 followers on Twitter, Dan is well-known across the Asia-Pacific region for his dynamic, energetic and passionate Keynote speeches on authentic classroom engagement, growth mindset and well-being. In this episode, Dan also speaks about his book #SchoolOfThought, a collection of blog-posts and essays which offer thought-provoking ideas and real-life insight into his experiences with students. We genuinely enjoyed chatting with Dan, finding his words open and honest and his ideas captivating.

Here’s a break-down of our chat complete with time-stamps:

  • What does Dan believe real (authentic) engagement actually looks like in schools? (3:50)
  • What tips and advice can Dan offer to teachers who want to authentically engage their students in the classroom? (5:16)
  • What kind of learning does Dan believe has a real sense of purpose and creates the conditions for authentic engagement? (9:00)
  • Why is Dan an advocate for Phillip Schlechty’s ‘continuum of engagement’ and what are the main steps? (10:20)
  • How does Dan believe we can pull-up ‘retreatist’, ‘passive’ and ‘ritualistic’ learners to higher levels of authentic engagement? (16:18)
  • Why is Dan passionate about Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindset? (18:40)
  • What are the five things Dan thinks teachers need in order to instil a growth mindset and build resilience in students? (20:54)
  • What does Dan think are the main barriers within our schools and communities that have a negative impact on mindset? (26:48)
  • Why is mental health and well-being so important to Dan? Why does he think anxiety is so common in students today? (28:30)
  • How does Dan believe we can improve well-being in schools and in school communities? (34:13)

We hope you enjoy this episode of The Staffroom and find Dan’s words as inspirational as we did. As always, we have a lot to take away from our chat – we discuss some top takeaways at the end of the episode. Like us, I know you will have a lot to think about.

Go purchase a copy of Dan’s excellent book, #SchoolOfThought which is available internationally on Amazon and can be ordered in Australia from Dan’s website, danhaesler.com. All profits from the book go to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation who work in remote areas of Australia delivering books to hard-to-reach children. We wish Dan all the best for 2018 and the growing success of his business Cut Through Coaching and Consulting.

Until next time!

Jamie, Michael and Tessa

Twitter:

@XpatEducator

@Michael_Royall

@tessa_johnson2